Pluma features Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar at Migrant Writes

Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar speaking to guests at Migrant Writes reading session. (Migrant Writes, Q8 Books, March 14)

Pluma Migrant Writers Guild in Kuwait hosted a novel reading session as well as writing talk by acclaimed author and scholar, Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar on the 14th of March, 2015, Saturday, 7:30-9:00 PM at Q8 Bookstore, Salmiya.

Rajakumar shared passages from her novel The Dohmestics, a book that explores the ups and downs of six women thrown together by fate in the quintessential Middle Eastern compound; a neighborhood enclosed by a boundary wall with a security gate. The reading was followed by the Q&A portion, writing exercises, and book signing.

Mujel Hasan reading "Libertad". (Migrant Writes, Q8 Books, March 14)

Mujel Hasan reading “Libertad”. (Migrant Writes, Q8 Books, March 14)

The evening also showcased Pluma writers’ readings of poems from their newly-published chapbook, No Return Address: A collection of poems, a collection of epistolary poems reflecting on the migrant’s perspectives and experiences while living in Kuwait. Other poems by the writers were also shared in the event. The session opened with Mujel Hasan’s Libertad, a poem inspired by the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

Nabeel Philip Mohan reading "Dear Parents," "Sand and Sea," and "Rare Occurrences".  (Migrant Writes, Q8 Books, March 14)

Nabeel Philip Mohan reading “Dear Parents,” “Sand and Sea,” and “Rare Occurrences”. (Migrant Writes, Q8 Books, March 14)

It was followed by Nabeel Philip Mohan’s Dear Parents, an epistle expressing a second generation migrant’s sentiments, and two of his recent pieces, Rare Occurrences and Sand and Sea, both depicting cultural conflict.

GAP Gutierrez reading "Blood on the Cornerstone". (Migrant Writes, Q8 Books, March 14)

GAP Gutierrez reading “Blood on the Cornerstone”. (Migrant Writes, Q8 Books, March 14)

GAP Gutierrez read Blood on the Cornerstone, an epistle addressed to migrants in the construction labor force. The poetry reading session ended with a piece by Armineonila M., Howdy, Cc, My Second Language, an epistolary poem written in e-mail format which highlights the thoughts on having a sibling abroad, as well as, the English translation of Alliah “Lenzkie” Tabaya’s HSW (Household Service Worker), a poem originally written in Filipino and tackles the vulnerabilities experienced by domestic workers in Kuwait.

Migrant Writes Event Program

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